International Women’s Day

Earlier this month, we celebrated International Women’s Day by highlighting a very few of the women involved in the 3D printing industry today. The accomplishments of women in the industry are many, though, and certainly not limited to that talented five — and theirs are the stories we’re looking to tell in a new 3D Printing Spotlight series, in which we shine a light on a more diverse range of voices in the industry. Women are makers, hobbyists, CEOs, founders, inventors, innovators, founders, partners, communicators, writers, tinkerers, YouTubers, artists — and have voices to be heard. Here at 3DPrint.com, we are proud to provide a platform in which we share the stories of the industry we all love and live by, and with this new series we will be using that unique stage to present the stories of more participants in the industry.

It’s important to note, at this point, that “feminism” isn’t a dirty word; the goal is always equality, not superiority. In beginning to look to this spotlight series, some of the feedback (yes, from men) I’ve received has been worry that we’ll be ignoring men and cutting coverage of men’s accomplishments, making the industry look unfriendly to women, or that “we don’t need to celebrate Women’s Day because we celebrate women every day” (not said by a member of our writing team). As any looking for an equal footing often find, the worry appears to be that those on the majority side feel concerned that their piece of the pie will get smaller; it’s not a pie. Just as those looking for equal rights face, their gaining rights doesn’t take away rights from those who have had them. As Maisie Williams, of Game of Thrones fame, said:

“I also feel like we should stop calling feminists ‘feminists’ and just start calling people who aren’t feminist ‘sexist’ — and then everyone else is just a human. You are either a normal person or a sexist. People get a label when they’re bad.”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PLe7Y9INnolcfl8QEUdD7Maz3C2qgMcCju&time_continue=2&v=Vx0Z6LplaMU 

The fact is that diversity is an important aspect of the world at large, and within the smaller worlds that are business operations. A more diverse community can come up with a wider variety of ideas and methods of implementation than can a homogeneous room of similar thinkers. Another fact of the matter is that women face issues in the business world that men simply don’t, from harassment to mansplaining. There aren’t as many of us represented.

 

The Diversity Panel at Inside 3D Printing San Diego 2016

This isn’t a new issue, but it’s also one that’s not going ignored anymore; while still not the most widely attended, an increasing number of conferences are featuring panels discussing issues of diversity in tech today. Women are here, and are working to be heard. Women in 3D Printing is one incredible organization acting as a platform for the community, highlighting the accomplishments happening all around us. Earlier this week, Rize’s Vice President of Marketing, Julie Reece, posted an insightful thought piece fol